Shenanigans in the air

Biggles would turn a whiter shade of pale, cough politely and leave the room! Falstaff was one of those real Gin swilling swingers of the roaring 1920s, an aviator whose priority wasn’t always ‘getting the Hun’, but chasing skirt, fornicating with flappers and having a jolly good time of it!

Tired of a respectable Biggles, lost without Flashman, can’t get enough Bond? Falstaff is the Black Sheep you are looking for!

Trouble is, that sort of behaviour can bring the service into disrupt! Once discharged from the RAF Falstaff wondered east. The lure of Shanghai, Tokyo and Polynesia kept him away from Europe. That was, until he was broke and cut off by his father. Now a mercenary, in the Spanish Civil war, China and Nanking, – Falstaff become not just an Ace but a legend! It was unavoidable, the King needed Falstaff, so Falstaff went to war!

Volume one The Call of the Thunder Dragon
He is a mercenary scoundrel. It is the eve of war in Europe, but Falstaff has unfinished business with a princess, the Japanese Army and loot still to find in the east. The incorrigible Falstaff is down but not out. His eye for the ladies and the chance for a quick buck have got him trouble again.

Falstaff’s ‘Journey to the West’, from remote China to high in mountainous Bhutan is an impossible dream, the only aircraft available is an antique, but Falstaff thinks he can pull it off.
Outstanding disputes with the Japanese threaten to bring down the might of the Japanese Imperial Army on a remote Chinese village unless Falstaff can get airborne again. With the help of a Princess, who willingly leads Falstaff to bath and bed, and an unlikely string of allies, Falstaff makes it on his way.
Ending in a dangerous clash high in the mountains of peaceful Bhutan, Falstaff must first face monstrous sized fish, monkey men, assassins, and the demonic father of the lost princess. Falstaff must choose between the east and the west. Fighting the Japanese or returning to Europe, as one by one his friends say good-bye.

Volume Two The Orange Dragon of Old Hanoi
Back in the RAF, under the wing of Naval intelligence Falstaff starts his career as a counter intelligence officer. Given a freehand to illuminate the Japanese and Germany agents operating in French Indo-China. Falstaff wastes no time in turning a German agent, catching up with a few old flames, unwittingly getting married, and dancing with a girl called named Rio, famous for her entertaining talents! He uncover covers the secret of the Dragons and goes in search of lost treasure. In the meantime he hatches a plan which could turn the tide of the war in the East and save England from invasion!

Follow the Continuing Adventures of Falstaff Wild:

https://tcaofalstaffwild.wordpress.com/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/MichaelJWMax

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About Max

Poet, Creative Writer, Essayist, Political Opinionist and Reviewer. Rock and Roll fix it man with two guitars, a spanner, some glue and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis! Michael aka Max struggles to balance his continued ill luck with the limits of his condition. He also is acutely aware of the difficulties facing M.E. suffers who are abused by the system. In addition to poetry and historical fiction Michael also writes delightful and original children’s stories. He is also considering the completion of the first installment of his imaginative historically accurate stories of ex-pats stranded far from home in Asia during War World II, ‘The Orange Dragon of Old Hanoi’ (Copyright 2007, 2014). ‘The Long Hard Highway’ is a collection of poems by aspiring British poet, writer and researcher of historical fiction, and children's author Michael J. Wormald. Self published for the first time on Amazon Kindle 2013. The Call of the Thunder Dragon Novel out now View all posts by Max

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